Love relationship pyramid

Love — Robert J. Sternberg

love relationship pyramid

Each component manifests a different aspect of love. Intimacy. Intimacy refers to feelings of closeness, connectedness, and bondedness in loving relationships. Love Relationship Pyramid - Buy Vastu Accessories at best price of Rs / piece(s) from Life Health Energy Center. Also find here related product comparison. The triangular theory of love is a theory of love developed by Robert Sternberg, a member of In the context of interpersonal relationships, "the three components of love, according to the triangular theory, are an intimacy component, a passion .

This tends to strengthen the tight bond that is shared between those two individuals. Additionally, having a sense of intimacy helps create the feeling of being at ease with one another, in the sense that the two parties are mutual in their feelings.

Intimacy is primarily defined as something of a personal or private nature; familiarity.

Triangular theory of love - Wikipedia

Unlike the other two blocks, commitment involves a conscious decision to stick with one another. The decision to remain committed is mainly determined by the level of satisfaction that a partner derives from the relationship.

There are three ways to define commitment: A promise to do or give something A promise to be loyal to someone or something the attitude of someone who works very hard to do or support something [3] "The amount of love one experiences depends on the absolute strength of these three components, and the type of love one experiences depends on their strengths relative to each other. A relationship based on a single element is less likely to survive than one based on two or three elements.

Early theories of love[ edit ] One of the first theories of love was developed by Sigmund Freud. As Freud so frequently attributed human nature to unconscious desires, his theory of love centered around the need for an "ego ideal". Another theory was introduced by Maslow. Maslow's hierarchy of needs places self-actualization at the peak.

love relationship pyramid

He maintains that those who have reached self-actualization are capable of love. Being in love was said to be attainable for those who could love for the sake of loving people, not just fixing one's own problem.

Of the multiple different early and later theories of love, there are two specific early theories that contribute to and influence Sternberg's theory. In his theory, to define romantic love, Rubin concludes that attachment, caring, and intimacy are the three main principles that are key to the difference of liking one person and loving them. Rubin states that if a person simply enjoys another's presence and spending time with them, that person only likes the other. However, if a person shares a strong desire for intimacy and contact, as well as cares equally about the other's needs and their own, the person loves the other.

It is clear that intimacy is an important aspect of love, ultimately using it to help define the difference between compassionate and passionate love. In his theory, using the analogy of primary colors to love, Lee defines the three different styles of love. It is important to realize that these kinds of love are, in fact, limiting cases: No relationship is likely to be a pure case of any of them.

love relationship pyramid

Nonlove refers simply to the absence of all three components of love. Infatuated love results from the experiencing of the passion component in the absence of the other components of love.

The Triangle of Love « Psych Digest

Empty love emanates from the decision that one loves another and is committed to that love in the absence of both the intimacy and passion components of love. Romantic love derives from a combination of the intimacy and passion components. Consummate, or complete love, results from the full combination of all three components. The geometry of the "love triangle" depends upon two factors: Differences in amounts of love are represented by differing areas of the love triangle: The greater the amount of love, the greater the area of the triangle.

Differences in balances of the three kinds of love are represented by differing shapes of triangles. For example, balanced love roughly equal amounts of each component is represented by an equilateral triangle.

Love Relationship Pyramid

Love does not involve only a single triangle. Rather, it involves a great number of triangles, only some of which are of major theoretical and practical interest. For example, it is possible to contrast real versus ideal triangles. One has not only a triangle representing his or her love for the other, but also a triangle representing an ideal other for that relationship.

Finally, it is important to distinguish between triangles of feelings and triangles of action. Theory of Love as a Story Love triangles emanate from stories. Almost all of us are exposed to large numbers of diverse stories that convey different conceptions of how love can be understood.

Some of these stories may be explicitly intended as love stories; others may have love stories embedded in the context of larger stories. Either way, we are provided with varied opportunities to observe multiple conceptions of what love can be. These stories may be observed by watching people in relationships, by watching media, or by reading fiction. It seems plausible, that as a result of our exposure to such stories, we form over time our own stories of what love is or should be.

love relationship pyramid

Various potential partners fit our stories to greater or lesser degrees, and we are more likely to succeed in close relationships with people whose stories more rather than less closely match our own.

Although fundamentally, the stories we create are our own, they draw on our experience of living in the world--on fairy stories we may have heard when we were young, from the models of love relationships we observe around us in parents and relatives, from television and movies, from conversations with other people about their relationships, and so forth.

Because the stories we have analyzed were from participants in the United States, our listing is likely to show some degree of cultural biased. Stories we have found to be particularly useful in conceptualizing people's notions of love are 1.

Strong anxious attachment; clinging behavior; anxiety at thought of losing partner. Love of partner for physical attractiveness; importance to person of partner's always looking good. Relationships as business propositions; money is power; partners in close relationships as business partners.

Partner viewed as "fitting in" to some overall scheme; partner viewed in a detached way.

Triangular theory of love

Depending on how much of each of the 3 components is present, the sides of the triangle are often unequal. For example, in a brand new relationship, Passion is likely to be the longest side of the triangle while the Intimacy and Commitment sides are likely to be substantially shorter, thus creating an isosceles triangle.

As described above, the 3 sides of the triangle are shortened or lengthened according to the amount of each component present in the relationship. The 3 components, then, can produce 8 types of love: As experiences grow with one another, this type of love may develop Commitment. This type of love can still be very satisfying and long-lasting.

According to Sternberg, couples with Complete or Consummate Love continue to share a deep desire on all levels to be with one another, even after many years. However, Sternberg also states that maintaining Consummate Love is a lot harder than achieving it in the first place.

love relationship pyramid

He stresses that it is essential for a couple to put all the components of love into action…after all, actions speak louder than words.