Self disclosure affect your relationship

self disclosure affect your relationship

Ever wonder how a relationship seems to just fade away? Old friends from school become whole different individuals when you meet up with. Explain how self-disclosure affects relationships. Social penetration theory compares the process of self-disclosure to peeling back the layers of an onion. limited the degree to which self–disclosure could predict which relationships. of intimacy (the other two are positive affect and partner listening/un-.

In other words, we may disclose to get something off our chest in hopes of finding relief, or we may not disclose out of fear that the other person may react negatively to our revelation.

Other-focused reasons for disclosure include a sense of responsibility to inform or educate. Other-focused reasons for not disclosing include feeling like the other person will not protect the information.

Interpersonal reasons for disclosure involve desires to maintain a trusting and intimate relationship. Interpersonal reasons for not disclosing include fear of losing the relationship or deeming the information irrelevant to the particular relationship.

Your decision to disclose an affair in order to be open with your partner and hopefully work through the aftermath together or withhold that information out of fear he or she will leave you is based on interpersonal reasons.

Finally, situational reasons may be the other person being available, directly asking a question, or being directly involved in or affected by the information being disclosed. Situational reasons for not disclosing include the person being unavailable, a lack of time to fully discuss the information, or the lack of a suitable i. For example, finding yourself in a quiet environment where neither person is busy could lead to disclosure, while a house full of company may not.

Deciding when to disclose something in a conversation may not seem as important as deciding whether or not to disclose at all. But deciding to disclose and then doing it at an awkward time in a conversation could lead to negative results. If you know they have an appointment or you have to go to class at a certain time, disclosing just before that time could limit your immediate exposure to any negative reaction.

Sometimes self-disclosure is unplanned. Someone may ask you a direct question or disclose personal information, which leads you to reciprocate disclosure.

Relationship Full Disclosure

In the case of a direct question, you may feel comfortable answering, you may give an indirect or general answer, or you may feel enough pressure or uncertainty to give a dishonest answer. If someone unexpectedly discloses, you may feel the need to reciprocate by also disclosing something personal. Face-to-face disclosures may feel more genuine or intimate given the shared physical presence and ability to receive verbal and nonverbal communication.

There is also an opportunity for immediate verbal and nonverbal feedback, such as asking follow-up questions or demonstrating support or encouragement through a hug. If the person reacts negatively, you may feel uncomfortable, pressured to stay, or even fearful. If you choose a mediated channel such as an e-mail or a letter, text, note, or phone call, you may seem less genuine or personal, but you have more control over the situation in that you can take time to carefully choose your words, and you do not have to immediately face the reaction of the other person.

This can be beneficial if you fear a negative or potentially violent reaction. Another disadvantage of choosing a mediated channel, however, is the loss of nonverbal communication that can add much context to a conversation. Although our discussion of the choices involved in self-disclosure so far have focused primarily on the discloser, self-disclosure is an interpersonal process that has much to do with the receiver of the disclosure.

Effects of Disclosure on the Relationship The process of self-disclosure is circular. An individual self-discloses, the recipient of the disclosure reacts, and the original discloser processes the reaction. How the receiver interprets and responds to the disclosure are key elements of the process. You may make a dispositional attribution that connects the cause of her disclosure to her personality by thinking, for example, that she is outgoing, inappropriate for the workplace, or fishing for information.

If the personality trait to which you attribute the disclosure is positive, then your reaction to the disclosure is more likely to be positive.

6.4 Self-Disclosure and Interpersonal Communication

Situational attributions identify the cause of a disclosure with the context or surroundings in which it takes place. Interpersonal attributions identify the relationship between sender and receiver as the cause of the disclosure. There may be added burdens if the information shared with you is a secret. As was noted earlier, there are clear risks involved in self-disclosure of intimate or potentially stigmatizing information if the receiver of the disclosure fails to keep that information secure.

This is not always a bad thing. You may strategically tell someone who is removed from the social network of the person who told you the secret to keep the information secure.

Although unburdening yourself can be a relief, sometimes people tell secrets they were entrusted to keep for less productive reasons. A research study of office workers found that 77 percent of workers that received a disclosure and were told not to tell anyone else told at least two other people by the end of the day Hargie, ! They reported doing so to receive attention for having inside information or to demonstrate their power or connection. When the cycle of disclosure ends up going well for the discloser, there is likely to be a greater sense of relational intimacy and self-worth, and there are also positive psychological effects such as reduced stress and increased feelings of social support.

Self-disclosure can also have effects on physical health. Key Takeaways Through the process of self-disclosure, we disclose personal information and learn about others. The social penetration theory argues that self-disclosure increases in breadth and depth as a relationship progresses, like peeling back the layers of an onion.

We engage in social comparison through self-disclosure, which may determine whether or not we pursue a relationship. Whether it is online or face-to-face, there are other reasons for disclosing or not, including self-focused, other-focused, interpersonal, and situational reasons.

Self-focused reasons for disclosure include having a sense of relief or catharsis, clarifying or correcting information, or seeking support. Self-focused reasons for not disclosing include fear of rejection and loss of privacy.

In other words, we may disclose to get something off our chest in hopes of finding relief, or we may not disclose out of fear that the other person may react negatively to our revelation. Other-focused reasons for disclosure include a sense of responsibility to inform or educate. Other-focused reasons for not disclosing include feeling like the other person will not protect the information.

Interpersonal reasons for disclosure involve desires to maintain a trusting and intimate relationship. Interpersonal reasons for not disclosing include fear of losing the relationship or deeming the information irrelevant to the particular relationship. Your decision to disclose an affair in order to be open with your partner and hopefully work through the aftermath together or withhold that information out of fear he or she will leave you is based on interpersonal reasons.

Finally, situational reasons may be the other person being available, directly asking a question, or being directly involved in or affected by the information being disclosed. Situational reasons for not disclosing include the person being unavailable, a lack of time to fully discuss the information, or the lack of a suitable i.

For example, finding yourself in a quiet environment where neither person is busy could lead to disclosure, while a house full of company may not. Deciding when to disclose something in a conversation may not seem as important as deciding whether or not to disclose at all.

But deciding to disclose and then doing it at an awkward time in a conversation could lead to negative results. As far as timing goes, you should consider whether to disclose the information early, in the middle, or late in a conversation.

If you know they have an appointment or you have to go to class at a certain time, disclosing just before that time could limit your immediate exposure to any negative reaction.

Sometimes self-disclosure is unplanned. Someone may ask you a direct question or disclose personal information, which leads you to reciprocate disclosure. In the case of a direct question, you may feel comfortable answering, you may give an indirect or general answer, or you may feel enough pressure or uncertainty to give a dishonest answer.

If someone unexpectedly discloses, you may feel the need to reciprocate by also disclosing something personal.

self disclosure affect your relationship

Face-to-face disclosures may feel more genuine or intimate given the shared physical presence and ability to receive verbal and nonverbal communication. There is also an opportunity for immediate verbal and nonverbal feedback, such as asking follow-up questions or demonstrating support or encouragement through a hug.

Self-Disclosure and Interpersonal Communication

If the person reacts negatively, you may feel uncomfortable, pressured to stay, or even fearful. If you choose a mediated channel such as an e-mail or a letter, text, note, or phone call, you may seem less genuine or personal, but you have more control over the situation in that you can take time to carefully choose your words, and you do not have to immediately face the reaction of the other person.

This can be beneficial if you fear a negative or potentially violent reaction. Another disadvantage of choosing a mediated channel, however, is the loss of nonverbal communication that can add much context to a conversation. Although our discussion of the choices involved in self-disclosure so far have focused primarily on the discloser, self-disclosure is an interpersonal process that has much to do with the receiver of the disclosure.

self disclosure affect your relationship

Effects of Disclosure on the Relationship The process of self-disclosure is circular. An individual self-discloses, the recipient of the disclosure reacts, and the original discloser processes the reaction. How the receiver interprets and responds to the disclosure are key elements of the process.

self disclosure affect your relationship

Crystal Jiang, Natalie N. Bazarova, and Jeffrey T. You may make a dispositional attribution Identifies the cause of a disclosure with the personality of the sender. If the personality trait to which you attribute the disclosure is positive, then your reaction to the disclosure is more likely to be positive.

Situational attributions Identifies the cause of a disclosure with the context or surroundings in which the disclosure takes place. Interpersonal attributions Identifies the relationship between the sender and receiver as the cause of the disclosure. There may be added burdens if the information shared with you is a secret.

As was noted earlier, there are clear risks involved in self-disclosure of intimate or potentially stigmatizing information if the receiver of the disclosure fails to keep that information secure. As the receiver of a secret, you may feel the need to unburden yourself from the co-ownership of the information by sharing it with someone else. This is not always a bad thing. You may strategically tell someone who is removed from the social network of the person who told you the secret to keep the information secure.

Although unburdening yourself can be a relief, sometimes people tell secrets they were entrusted to keep for less productive reasons. A research study of office workers found that 77 percent of workers that received a disclosure and were told not to tell anyone else told at least two other people by the end of the day!

They reported doing so to receive attention for having inside information or to demonstrate their power or connection. When the cycle of disclosure ends up going well for the discloser, there is likely to be a greater sense of relational intimacy and self-worth, and there are also positive psychological effects such as reduced stress and increased feelings of social support.

Self-disclosure can also have effects on physical health. Opening yourself up by expressing personal information to another truly creates a potentially dangerous vulnerability in a relationship. While it can be done in different levels of intimacy depending on exactly how personal or secretive the information is, either way, presenting such information to a romantic partner is an act that could potentially cause a greater connection or unwanted hurt in a relationship.

Because of this, it is very important that one understands how much, and what to self-disclose depending on if one is a man or a woman and depending on the type of relationship they are experiencing or potentially wish to experience with their partner. Being careful and knowledgeable about the risks and benefits of self-disclosure is the key.

Women are emotional beings with a lot of feelings and thoughts that need to be let out, especially to a romantic partner that they are close to.

The Dos and Don’ts of Self-Disclosure in Romantic Relationships

However, many times, women self-disclose sooner than is appropriate or safe. Women may even be eager to self-disclose in hopes of speeding up the intimacy process or development of a relationship. This is what women need to be careful of. On the contrary, men seem to have a difficult time self-disclosing. Some men do it more often or more easily than others but in comparison to women, men are the more reserved of the two.

This extreme difference in males and females is the catalyst of many miscommunications and issues in romantic relationships. While women consider self-disclosure to be an expression of their personal, internal selves, men see it as an expression of their public, external selves Knapp et al.

Men often find themselves in relational turmoil caused by their hesitation to self-disclose. Lacking willingness to self-disclose can potentially—and very often does—cause serious conflicts in a romantic relationship. Men need to be aware that certain levels and frequencies of self-disclosure are truly necessary for a romantic relationship to function successfully.

Now, taking into consideration the polar differences in men and women and how they self-disclose, one must also consider what type of romantic relationship is appropriate for what amount of self-disclosure. There are three general levels of romantic relationships that must be acknowledged: As one may assume, self-disclosure should ideally be a gradual process of expressing personal information about oneself, just as these three levels of relationships are general, gradual stages of romantic relational development.

self disclosure affect your relationship

Casual relationships are not the point in a relationship for deep expression while committed relationships require personal expression for the sake of the relationship.